Mini Turkey Meatloaf

Substituting ground turkey for ground beef in some of your favorite recipes can provide many health benefits, such as reducing the saturated fat and cholesterol levels in each meal. Ground turkey has a lower calorie count and is higher is protein. It also contributes to your daily requirements for B-complex vitamins and selenium.

Selenium is a trace-mineral that is essential to all functions of the body. It’s main roles are for DNA synthesis and protection from oxidative damage and infection. Just three ounces of ground turkey contains 40% of the recommended daily intake of selenium.

Try making this recipe at home and let us know what you think, we would love to hear how it turned out for you.

Enjoy!

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Substituting ground turkey for ground beef in some of your favorite recipes can provide many health benefits, such as reducing the saturated fat and cholesterol levels in each meal. Ground turkey has a lower calorie count and is higher is protein. It also contributes to your daily requirements for B-complex vitamins and selenium. Selenium is… Read more.

Seasonal Vegetable Frittata

Eating well is important for everyone, but it is essential for people living with, through and beyond cancer, which is why we have created a series of cooking tutorials to make cooking a fun and enjoyable experience! Each month we will be launching a new video on our various social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube), so be sure to go follow us.

In our first video, we are cooking seasonal vegetable frittatas. We chose broccoli as one of the main ingredients of this dish because it is packed with folate, potassium, magnesium, and fiber. According to recent research, broccoli can help block a defective gene that is associated with tumor growth. One cup of raw broccoli will also provide 135% of the suggested Vitamin C intake for the day.

We hope you enjoy this delicious recipe and the ones to come as we do! To register for our next Cooking for Wellness program, click here.

Enjoy!

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Eating well is important for everyone, but it is essential for people living with, through and beyond cancer, which is why we have created a series of cooking tutorials to make cooking a fun and enjoyable experience! Each month we will be launching a new video on our various social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn,… Read more.

There Is Strength To Be Found In Sharing The Journey

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Dr. David Houchens spent 35 years in preclinical and clinical cancer research in a variety of cancer types. He directed laboratory studies and coordinated research efforts related to prevention, detection, and treatment at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, and at Battelle Memorial Institute, as well as in a private bio-tech firm here in Columbus.

In 2001, Dave was diagnosed with prostate cancer and came face to face with the disease in a personal way.  His cancer diagnosis had a tremendous impact on his wife, Kathie, a foreign language educator, musician, artist and spiritual director.

As a caregiver, Kathie has found it important and helpful to become involved at Cancer Support Community as a way to maintain her own balance and well-being, and to reach out to others in a spirit of hope and compassion. Here is her story:

When he got the diagnosis Dave was not surprised.  He had been following his PSA blood level for a number of years and even had had a negative biopsy.  When a follow-up showed the cancer, he knew he had options for treatment, and the “gold standard” at the time was surgery.  He chose to have a radical prostatectomy.

I, on the other hand, was stunned and in a state of shock.  I had just lost my father to cancer two years earlier, and could hardly fathom losing a husband, too.  It meant an abrupt change of lifestyle; the fear of becoming a young widow made me think about commitments that kept me from spending time with Dave. After-work events that took us in separate directions were now not going to have priority on the calendar. We each began to see each other with new eyes; every day was precious to us as we entered a world of discovering ways to cope.

Dave is a “glass half full” kind of person.  He will find the positive side of even the bleakest situation.  He never complains and is easy to live with.

The class at Cancer Support Community that attracted me first was Gentle Yoga. I was invited to join the class by Abby Dorn, the instructor, who also teaches yoga at The James. There is a limit on how long programs at The James are available, so I chose to continue the classes at Cancer Support Community.

The yoga program has made the biggest difference in keeping me calm about whatever comes next.  By maintaining my flexibility as I age, it makes everything else I do easier.  One of my ways to give back was to make lavender-filled eye masks for the yoga participants who made donations to Cancer Support Community in return.

The Cooking for Wellness class has been the best option for Dave and me to do together. We have learned a lot about the way food can enhance the healing process. New recipes and kitchen tips keep adding spice to our lives, both literally and figuratively.  One of the best things we discovered together was a change in diet and lifestyle.  As a caregiver I felt empowered to DO SOMETHING!  That’s what I needed.  Dave had his treatment and recovery to occupy him, but I felt like a bystander until I found out I could cook our way to better health.

We live close to the Cancer Support Community facility, so we feel fortunate to be able to take advantage of the variety of programs with minimal travel time to get there and back.

I’ve found that there is strength in sharing the journey with others who are on their own road through treatment and into recovery.  It takes a lot of energy to pretend you are “fine” when you’re not, and that energy can be channeled into your healing once you plug into the resources available to you and find ways to process all that is going on with your body, your mind and your spiritual health.

We’re now in our fifteenth year of living with cancer, and we have made cancer support and education our mission since it is part of our life.  Prostate cancer is a couple’s disease. We are in it together.  Our coping, strategizing, researching treatment options and finding ways to reach out to others has been a team effort that has been enhanced and broadened by the resources and programs at Cancer Support Community and the people we’ve met there.  We keep finding new ways to give back, to be good listeners, to hold a hand or accompany someone else through a rough patch.

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Dr. David Houchens spent 35 years in preclinical and clinical cancer research in a variety of cancer types. He directed laboratory studies and coordinated research efforts related to prevention, detection, and treatment at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, and at Battelle Memorial Institute, as well as in a private bio-tech firm here… Read more.

This Place Is Like A Flower, by Debbie Beyer

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“It’s like a flower to me.” That’s how Rosalyn Green describes Cancer Support Community. Rosalyn is a regular attendee at the Qigong, Tai Chi and Gentle Yoga classes, which she says bring her peace of mind and help give her a better understanding of her body. “It’s like I’m blossoming and growing. I’m learning who I am through these classes.”

Rosalyn had been feeling poorly over a prolonged period and her white blood count was rising, so her family doctor referred her to an oncologist. After numerous tests, Rosalyn was diagnosed in 2013 with Stage III multiple myeloma, the second most common blood cancer in the U.S.

A New Jersey native, Rosalyn moved to Columbus five years ago to raise her two grandchildren and to be close to other family members. “I came here for a better life,” she said, referring to the high rate of crime in the Camden neighborhood she left behind.

After her diagnosis, Rosalyn had two six-month rounds of chemotherapy, which helped her manage the pain she was experiencing. But 18 months later, she ended up back in the hospital; her lymph nodes had swollen to the point that she was having trouble breathing.

Rosalyn’s cancer journey has included periods of depression, where she would isolate herself from others. “There were times when I didn’t feel good and I was mad. Everything got on my nerves and I didn’t want to be around other people,” she explained. Because she was constantly feeling sick and fatigued, Rosalyn to have to quit her job as a Certified Nurse’s Aide.  With two growing boys to look after, she was experiencing a lot of stress.

In October 2016, Rosalyn decided to look into Cancer Support Community. She had seen the sign in front of the building and stopped in one day to learn more. “It was one of the best things I could have done,” Rosalyn stated.

After attending the Newcomer Welcome program, Rosalyn began participating in Mindfulness Meditation and other classes to reduce her stress and anxiety. “I feel energized,” Rosalyn said about the Tai Chi, Qigong and Gentle Yoga classes. “It has helped me gain strength and mental clarity.”

“When I was sick all the time, I just wasn’t happy,” Rosalyn explained. “Feeling bad impacts how you look at everything, including yourself.  It impacts your feeling of self-worth.”

“I look forward to coming here; I love this place,” Rosalyn said abut Cancer Support Community. She has started to understand what her body is going through, and she is paying a lot of attention to what she eats. Juicing is one of her daily routines now.

“I have knowledge now and I must keep moving forward. There’s no cure for multiple myeloma, but it can be managed, and that’s what I’m doing now. I’m very grateful for Cancer Support Community.”

Written By: Debbie Beyer

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“It’s like a flower to me.” That’s how Rosalyn Green describes Cancer Support Community. Rosalyn is a regular attendee at the Qigong, Tai Chi and Gentle Yoga classes, which she says bring her peace of mind and help give her a better understanding of her body. “It’s like I’m blossoming and growing. I’m learning who… Read more.

A Place of So Many Thank Yous

One sentence, three words— “You have cancer.” Hearing this once is enough for an entire lifetime, but for Cheryl Eddy, that was not case. Over the last five years, Cheryl has been burdened with hearing that message three times. But throughout these years, she has managed to beat the odds and she continues on her cancer journey every day with a smile on her face.

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Cheryl was first diagnosed with Stage II breast cancer and went on a three-week downward spiral. Not only had she been given a cancer diagnosis, Cheryl believed she was given her death sentence as well. Due to the past experiences of people she was surrounded by, cancer always seemed to win. It wasn’t until she joined a support group that she came to the realization that this cancer diagnosis didn’t have to get the best of her; she found hope.

Unfortunately, the support group Cheryl was attending ended after two years, but she heard about Cancer Support Community from another survivor in her group. The rest is history and Cheryl has been attending support groups, Tai Chi, Mindfulness Meditation, and Yoga Mudra ever since.

A few years after the breast cancer diagnosis, Cheryl heard that dreadful sentence once more when she was diagnosed with Stage I A Endometrial cancer. She had a hysterectomy and underwent radiation.

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But it turns out that it was not all that bad in comparison to the news she would receive in the months that followed. Cheryl’s breast cancer had metastasized to the bone in her left leg and was now Stage IV with a three- to five-year survivorship. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation followed – once again. “That really took a toll on me mentally and physically,” said Cheryl. “Not realizing how limited I would be physically, I found myself needing help but found it difficult to ask for it.”

Today, Cheryl is taking one day at a time, and enjoying the people around her. Throughout her cancer journey, Cheryl credits much of her resilience and positive outlook to Cancer Support Community. “This is a place of so many ‘thank yous’ and no ‘pleases,’” Cheryl said when describing the organization. “I truly believe that I would not be in the place I am today without the community of people I’ve met by attending the programs at Cancer Support Community,” Cheryl offered.

The cards, visits, and kind words of encouragement during her recovery from everyone here at Cancer Support Community have taught Cheryl that it is okay to ask for help, but most importantly, it has allowed her to embrace the feeling of hope she had felt when she was first diagnosed five years ago.

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One sentence, three words— “You have cancer.” Hearing this once is enough for an entire lifetime, but for Cheryl Eddy, that was not case. Over the last five years, Cheryl has been burdened with hearing that message three times. But throughout these years, she has managed to beat the odds and she continues on her… Read more.